Sequestration: The Effects on Aviation and Everyday Travel : Report from NATCA

How Sequestration Will Affect the Flying Public and the U.S. Economy

- Washington, USA

Introduction

As the exclusive representative of air traffic controllers, traffic manager coordinators, U.S. NOTAM Specialists, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) engineers, aircraft certification professionals, and other aviation safety professionals, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) believes that the looming across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration will be detrimental to the National Airspace System (NAS), as well as to the nation’s fragile economy. All users and operators of the NAS including travelers, general aviation pilots, airlines, businesses and the military will feel the effects of the cuts in the form of a reduction in airport and air traffic control services, a diminishing of the NAS’s flight capacity, increased delays and costs to users, and lags in air traffic modernization. These cuts will be significant, and their effects will likely have long-lasting consequences.

Executive Summary      

Sequestration is the process of automatic, across-the-board spending reductions under which budgetary resources are permanently canceled to enforce certain budget policy goals. Sequestration was mandated in the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011, and intended to motivate Congress to reach a compromise on $1.3 trillion in savings over the next 10 years. When Congress failed to find that compromise, the BCA triggered sequestration.

Passage of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 on January 3, 2013, has altered the terms of sequestration for fiscal year 2013 (FY 2013) by providing an offset. Under the BCA, the FAA would have had to reduce their Operations budget by approximately $88 million a month for nine straight months. Under the new sequestration reductions set to take effect on March 1, the FAA will have to reduce its Operations budget by $70.5 million a month for the next seven months until the end of FY 2013. Since the cuts must now be implemented over the course of seven, not 12 months, sequestration will require dramatic indiscriminant cuts significantly affecting services and capacity.

If sequestration as it currently exists is implemented, the FAA will be mandated to cut a total of $492.9 million from their Operations budget which includes the air traffic controller workforce, $142.4 million from Facilities and Equipment line, which maintains towers and equipment such as navigation beacons, and $8.6 million from the Research, Engineering, and Development line, which funds research on improving aviation safety and operational efficiency, as well as research on reducing the environmental impact of aviation.

On February 22, the Department of Transportation (DOT) issued a statement confirming several actions the FAA may take in order to implement across-the-board sequestration cuts:

•     Closing over 100 air traffic controller towers at airports with fewer than 150,000 flight operations or 10,000 commercial operations per year. They intend for these closures to begin in April.

•     Furloughing FAA employees for at least one, and possibly two days per pay period (equivalent to 11-22 furlough days per employee between now and the end of FY 2013). These furloughs would begin in mid April.

•   Eliminating the overnight shift at over 60 towers across the country.

•   Reducing preventive maintenance and equipment provisioning and support for all NAS equipment.

If these cuts proceed as scheduled, the consequences would begin to result in noticeable operational impacts in mid April. Tower closures and controller furloughs will significantly reduce the capacity of the NAS, negatively affecting the flying public, as well as business and military operations, in numerous ways. A reduction in air traffic control services will ultimately result in fewer flights in the air and increased delays on the tarmac, creating a ripple effect that will hurt the airlines, pilots, flight attendants, private aviation, airport employees, passengers, and all businesses that depend on a vibrant aviation sector, such as those that use air services to transport their goods. These aviation cuts will also negatively affect local communities and their economies, which depend on aviation to attract business.

FAA employees, including air traffic controllers, safety inspectors and other safety professionals, will face between 11 and 22 days of furloughs. According to Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood, about 10 percent of the workforce would be furloughed on any given day. This will place a heavy strain on a system that operates continuously every hour of every day as there are only 12,770 fully certified air traffic controllers in the FAA. Safety will remain the top priority, but in order to maintain the appropriate level of safety with fewer controllers, fewer planes will be allowed in the sky, as well as in and out of airports.

Those who use and operate the system could experience the following negative consequences as a result of sequestration:

•   Reduction in capacity, limiting the number of flights in the air for all forms of aviation.

•   Increased delays due to longer ground holds.

•   Reduction in airport services.

•   Increased costs to airlines and passengers.

•   Delays to air traffic control modernization.

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller called the deep sequester cuts "reckless," and said the impact would be severe for travelers, as well as smaller communities. "Everyone who travels for business or pleasure will be adversely affected. The administration will never compromise our aviation safety, but practically closing airports in small communities by eliminating air traffic control services will be devastating to local economies," Rockefeller said.

The negative effects on the aviation system made under sequestration could become permanent or be difficult, if not impossible, to reverse once they are implemented. If sequestration cuts continue beyond FY 2013, the cuts will result in a weaker airspace system that looks and performs very differently from the safe and efficient model that exists today. Continuing into FY 2014, the prescribed reductions would revert to an 8.2 percent cut for each of the next nine years, as required by the BCA. If that should occur, aviation safety professionals could be subject to reductions in force (RIFs) and further hiring freezes. Again, safety would be preserved, but the cost would be another decrease in capacity and increased delays and costs for all users of the system. Given the uncertainty regarding how long sequestration will continue, all of these detrimental effects on the NAS and the national economy remain a serious concern.

Aviation and the Economy    

Aviation is a major driver of the U.S. economy. Commercial aviation contributes $1.3 trillion in economic activity and comprises 5.2 percent of our Gross Domestic Product (GDP) annually, while providing $75 billion against the U.S. trade deficit. This significant volume of economic activity supports 10.2 million U.S. jobs with $394.4 billion in annual earnings. In 2009, airline operations contributed $150.5 billion to the national GDP, while airport operations generated an additional $44.6 billion.

In addition to the economic contributions, aviation benefits the United States by providing invaluable services to beneficiaries such as individual passengers, airlines, general aviation pilots, the military, and businesses. Two million passengers fly safely through the U.S. NAS on 70,000 flights each day. Facilitated by aviation safety professionals at the FAA, DOD and in the Federal Contract Towers, the NAS is not only the safest and most efficient in the world, but is also a catalyst for U.S. job creation.

Aviation provides the flying public, as well as private businesses and the military, with trained inspectors, professional air traffic controllers, and certification processes that ensure every person, pilot, and aircraft in the NAS is functioning at the highest level of safety and efficiency.

How Sequestration will be Implemented at the FAA    

Across-the-board cuts mean sequestration will affect each budget line in the FAA’s budget. At this time, agencies have very limited discretion in how they apply the cuts. Due to the offsets in the American Taxpayer Relief Act passed earlier this year, the total amount to be cut from non- defense discretionary programs is now $85 billion (as opposed to $109 billion). However, the cuts will need to occur over seven months instead of over a full year. Thus each non-defense discretionary budget line will be cut by 5.1 percent for FY 2013. This translates into cutting $492.9 million from the FAA’s Operations budget line, which includes the controller workforce, $142.4 million from Facilities and Equipment line, which maintains towers and tools such as navigation beacons, and $8.6 million from the Research, Engineering, and Development line, which funds research on improving aviation safety and operational efficiency, as well as research on reducing the environmental impact of aviation. Below is a chart detailing the new amounts to be cut for FY 2013.

1st Sequestration

(Jan 2, 2013)

2nd Sequestration

(March 1, 2013)

Total $ to be cut

$109.3 B

$85.3 B

Total Defense

54.6 B (9.4%)

$42.5 B (7.3%)

Total Non-Defense

Discretionary

$38 B (8.2%)

$26.4 B (5.1%)

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA): Sequestration Cuts

Operations

$792 M

$492.9 M

Facilities & Equipment

$229 M

$142.4 M

Research, Engineering Development

$14 M

$8.6 M

Note: Cuts for Jan. 2, 2013, are taken from the September 2012 OMB memo. Cuts for March 1, 2013, were based on a 5.1 % across-the-board reduction.

Sequestration and the Capacity of our Airspace    

Sequestration cuts would significantly reduce the capacity of the NAS, negatively affecting passengers, as well as business and military operations, in numerous ways. Cuts of this magnitude simply cannot be implemented without a significant effect on operations and capacity. Sequestration cuts will create a ripple effect, beginning with the closing of over 100 air traffic towers, the elimination of overnight operations at small air traffic control towers, and the furloughing of thousands of air traffic controllers, and ending with reduced services, decreased capacity, and increased delays throughout the entire system.

Closing over 100 Towers: Our December report outlined the likelihood that sequestration would force the FAA to close air traffic control towers. On February 22, the DOT announced that it expects to begin closing over 100 towers in April. The list of possible towers to be closed includes both FAA and Federal Contract Tower facilities. This FAA-provided list is included at the end of this report.

The number of towers targeted for closure is far higher than anticipated, and will be a serious burden for communities that rely on air traffic control services to attract and maintain businesses. Even temporarily closing a tower affects the NAS. First and foremost, tower controllers give first priority to separating aircraft and issuing safety and weather alerts. Without controllers in the tower, no one will be performing these critical safety functions.  Additionally, in most cases, the airspace normally controlled by the tower would revert to uncontrolled airspace. When this occurs, the overlying radar facility (terminal or enroute FAA facilities) would then be responsible for the operations normally worked by the towers. As such, workloads would increase dramatically for FAA facilities compensating for closed towers while they are already coping with reduced staffing due to furloughs. This significant adjustment in workload and responsibility while furloughing personnel would significantly decrease efficiency throughout the national airspace.

The sequester would have an outsized impact on small communities primarily served by regional airlines, according to the Regional Airline Association (RAA). “The communities most dependent on scheduled service from regional airlines for their only connection to the global economy will be hurt the most,” said RAA President Roger Cohen in a statement. He said passengers from communities where regional carriers are the only regular service will be hit by a “double whammy” of shift reductions or airport closings at smaller airports where flights might originate or end, as well as delays and missed connections at connecting hub airports.

These towers also provide military and commercial services that are revenue-generators for their communities. For example, Rogers, Ark. (ROG) serves Walmart and its vendors, as well as Kraft Foods, Hudson Foods, Tyson and J.B. Hunt. The community will suffer if the tower is closed and these businesses either leave or reduce their operations. Similarly, Caterpillar Inc., and Shell are located at Victoria, Texas (VCT) airport, and UPS and Delta are served by the Albany, Ga. (ABY) tower. Albany provides service for Delta Connection flights as well as for the Army, Air Force and for National Guard practice approaches. Each of these services benefits the local communities by attracting businesses that contribute to their economies.

Mandatory Furloughs: On February 22, the DOT announced that it would be issuing furloughs for FAA employees between now and the end of September 2013. Employees may face one to two furloughs per pay period, equaling a total of 11 to 22 furlough days. There are currently no exemptions for anyone working at a federal agency based upon emergency or essential status. The Air Traffic Organization employs 35,000 people, including 14,752 air traffic controllers (of which roughly 2,000 are in training and not fully certified, and 3,100 currently eligible to retire), 7,000 engineers and maintenance technicians, 5,000 supervisors and managers, as well as safety inspectors (CRS Report October 2012). The 7,500 full time equivalent positions including regulators, safety inspectors, safety engineers, and support personnel who are responsible for all federal aviation safety standards and compliance with those standards would also be furloughed. This means reducing the hours of the people who certify aircraft and aircraft components, ensure regulation and oversight of airlines and other aircraft operators, and implement initiatives to reduce safety risks associated with airport operations.

Controller Attrition and Staffing: These mandatory furloughs will occur at a time when Congress and the Administration are also weighing changes to federal employees’ pay and benefits. In the event that both furloughs and negative pay and benefit changes are implemented, federal employees may elect to retire. Air traffic controllers and other safety professionals eligible to retire would be more likely to take advantage of retirement options rather than face a situation where fewer controllers are being asked to maintain the NAS with the same safety and efficiency standards as when the workforce is at full capacity. Over the next ten years, the FAA estimates that more than 12,100 controllers will leave the workforce due to retirement and normal attrition.

History and experience dictate that an attrition rate that high has serious consequences: Between September 2006 and July 2008, 3,312 controllers left the FAA. This mass exodus of controllers left the system staffed at only 71 percent of the acceptable level with the lowest number of certified professional controllers (CPCs) in 16 years. Understaffing caused a significant increase in controller workload and a subsequent need to increase the use of overtime, resulting in an unsustainable rise in controller fatigue. That workforce included many veteran controllers with 15 or more years of experience as compared to today’s workforce, which is less experienced; as of February 2013, about 34 percent of controllers (a little over 5,000) have been hired within the last five years. Their expertise and qualifications are excellent, but it will be a challenge for them to manage the extraordinary burden of handling more traffic with a significantly reduced workforce.

Under the sequestration scenario, there could be dramatic staff departures from the nation’s busiest hubs. Additionally, training replacements at these complex facilities would take several years to complete. Potential retirements coupled with furloughs would significantly affect areas such as New York, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles and Chicago.

For example, at the New York Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZNY), a total of 103 out of 376 controllers will be eligible for retirement by January 1, 2014. That means we could lose 27 percent of that workforce. At Atlanta Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZTL), 125 out of 475 (26 percent) controllers would be in a position to retire on January 1, 2014. And at Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZAU), 140 controllers out of 432 (32 percent) could retire on January 1, 2014. Under normal circumstances, these statistics are concerning, but when coupled with the cuts mandated by sequestration, as well as a hiring freeze, controlling traffic with reduced staff could become unsustainable.

These numbers are staggering, especially given the fact that it takes three years to train a new hire to work in such complex airspace. If these controllers retire, the FAA would be faced with a nearly insurmountable loss of controllers. At the same time, they would be hard-pressed to train replacements as quickly as they are leaving.

Hiring Freeze: Another consequence of sequestration will likely be a hiring freeze. Congress is already discussing reducing the federal employee workforce by 10 percent through attrition. If sequestration is allowed to take effect over the long-term, it will be next to impossible for the FAA to continue hiring a new workforce. As outlined above, this could be especially detrimental to the workforce, as many current air traffic controllers are currently eligible to retire, or will be eligible in the next several years. With a hiring freeze, the FAA would be unable to replace senior controllers and keep pace with ordinary attrition.

A Less Efficient National Airspace System: Airports, airlines and passengers will all be immediately and directly affected by sequestration cuts that reduce air traffic services. If the NAS is forced to reduce capacity, airlines will have fewer flights, and fewer passengers will fly. That, in turn, will affect airports that rely on passenger fees, landing fees, and other revenue generated by passengers. At a hearing held by the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee in July 2012, Airlines for America President Nicholas Calio noted that airlines could become less competitive, and may have to cede international routes due to reduced revenue. This would force them to reduce the scope of their markets, putting U.S.-based businesses at a competitive disadvantage.

As a consequence of the sequestration cuts, the FAA predicts that flights to major cities such as New York, Chicago, and San Francisco could experience delays of up to 90 minutes during peak hours because fewer air traffic controllers on duty means fewer aircraft in the sky.

We believe that if the cuts and furloughs are fully implemented in April, the FAA’s estimates could turn out to be conservative. According to an informal survey of major air traffic control facilities, we have determined that reduced numbers of controllers around the country will cause a ripple effect of flight delays. Major airports could be forced to shut down a runway that would dotherwise be open simply because they’ll have fewer controllers in towers. Others will need to shift controllers to the busiest parts of the day, thus decreasing their capacity to handle incoming flights at other times. For example, furloughs could force Atlanta to close one runway, reducing its hourly arrival rate during clear-weather conditions from 126 arrivals per hour to 96 arrivals per hour, a 24 percent reduction. In both Chicago and Houston, under ideal weather conditions and using two runways instead of three, the hourly arrival rate could fall by 37 percent. Other major airports would experience similar reductions. Taken together, these reductions will add up to a national airspace facing significant delays throughout the system.

Commercial Airlines: When the capacity of the NAS is reduced, airlines will suffer from increased delays and increased costs. The simple reality is that fewer flights will be in the air at one time, which will lead to increased ground delays, as aircraft must wait longer at the gate and on the tarmac. Increased ground delays will lead to increased fuel consumption and increased costs for airlines. History has shown that increased delays lead to an increase in flight cancellations as delays add up over the course of each day and some flights are cancelled. This in turn would increase the airlines’ passenger load factor, making seats a scarce commodity, and increasing costs to the consumer, which will likely lead to reduced travel expenditures, reduced expenditures on hospitality, and reduced tourism, each of which will have significant impacts on the economy. Reduced capacity in the airspace could also lead to reduced freight expenditures. If sequestration continues into FY 2014, these additional costs will likely seriously harm airlines’ revenue, as well as the ability for ordinary passengers to continue leisure travel.

General Aviation: General aviation (GA) consists of all civilian air traffic that is not scheduled passenger airline service. Eliminating air traffic control services at smaller airports will greatly affect this segment of air traffic because GA pilots rely on air traffic controllers on approach and takeoff.  Of the towers that face the highest threat of closure, many primarily handle GA traffic. Without a controller physically present in these towers, more pilots will have to land and take off on their own, without the benefit of safety and separation services. In addition to the obvious safety concerns, the lack of air traffic control services can cause significant and costly delays for GA pilots. This will occur when GA pilots are forced to wait longer for each approach and departure as only one aircraft can arrive and/or depart at a time without air traffic services. Having reduced services at smaller airports will have a serious economic effect on communities that rely on air transit for businesses and other purposes.

General aviation training will also be affected because pilot qualifications require a certain number of takeoffs and landings at towered airports. General aviation pilots will have limited access to towered airports, thus hindering the training process.

NextGen: If sequestration takes place, significant projects may be slowed down at a time when the FAA, NATCA, and the aviation industry are finally seeing progress on programs such as En Route Automation Modernization (ERAM), Optimization of Airspace and Procedures in the Metroplex (OAPM), Satellite Based Surveillance (SBS) and Terminal Automation Modernization and Replacement (TAMR). These efforts could flounder when collaboration is finally paying off because furloughed controllers would not be available to participate in collaborative workgroups as operational experts. Programs such as ERAM, once in trouble when the front-line workforce was not involved, has significantly benefited from the insight of aviation professionals whose invaluable expertise would be lost through the required cuts under sequestration.

One collaborative NextGen project showing particular progress is OAPM, which is a joint effort by the FAA and aviation industry aimed at integrating airspace and de-conflicting traffic flows over major metropolitan areas (known as metroplexes). OAPM study teams at sites around the country rely on current aircraft navigation capabilities to enhance airport arrival and departure paths, provide diverging departure paths to get aircraft off the ground more quickly, and add more direct, high-altitude RNAV navigation routes between metroplexes. D.C. Metro OAPM, Houston OAPM, and North Texas OAPM have all completed the design phase and are moving into the evaluation phase. Northern California OPAM is the next site to complete its design phase, and Charlotte and Atlanta OAPMs are quickly approaching 90 percent completion of their design. Southern California OAPM is only three weeks into the design phase, and Florida OAPM is supposed to begin in April 2013. Early returns in the Washington, D.C. area indicate substantial fuel savings and reduced carbon emissions. If sequestration cuts were to take place, all OAPM study teams could be stopped. This would mean the millions of dollars the FAA has spent in research would not yield the results that other study sites, such as the Washington D.C. area, have demonstrated.

NextGen delays would also have an overall effect on the economy. If research, planning, and construction spending is reduced, not only will essential modernizations be delayed, but less money will be invested in the U.S. economy. The Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) study found that a reduction of 30 percent in NextGen funding could result in up to $40 billion in lost economic output by 2021. It could cost 700,000 jobs by 2021, and as many as 1.3 million by 2035 (AIA July 2012 Report).

National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) president Ed Bolen said that the risks to the nation’s air transportation system posed by sequestration are serious. “Concerns over the prospect of sequestration have created an added level of uncertainty for system users,” Bolen said. “Potential cuts in FAA funding overall, and NextGen funding in particular, would have a severe impact on the NextGen implementation process.” (NBAA Sept. 12, 2012).

Conclusion  

Aviation is an essential component of our national economy, contributing $1.3 trillion every year to our GDP. In order to continue contributing to economic growth, the FAA needs appropriate, predictable funding to continue directing the safest, most complex and efficient airspace in the world. If Congress allows sequestration to become a reality, cuts to aviation will be widespread; The NAS supports a wide array of commercial and private activities, and cutting services, reducing safety monitoring, and reducing the controller workforce are all steps toward permanently reducing the capacity of the NAS – we do not foresee these services being restored to their current levels if these cuts are allowed to take place. In addition, shifting the financial liability away from the federal government and onto local and municipal governments will create a burden on rural communities who will be unable to support essential aviation services necessary to small communities and businesses around the country. As the cuts under sequestration force the FAA to take measures that reduce capacity and limit services to otherwise inaccessible communities, the entire economy will be affected.

On February 15, 2013, Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood wrote a letter to Chairwoman Barbara Mikulski of the Senate Appropriations Committee. In that letter, the Secretary used strong language to describe the “serious impacts on transportation services that are critical to the traveling public.” He predicted that “the furlough of a large number of air traffic controllers and technicians will require a reduction in air traffic to a level that can be safely managed by remaining staff. The result will be felt across the country, as the volume of travel must be decreased. Sequestration could slow air traffic levels in major cities, which will result in delays and disruptions across the country.”

We in the aviation community are proud users and providers of aviation services. As the front line in this field, it is our role to warn the rest of the country that aviation cuts will be detrimental to our economy, and will result in widespread delays, cuts, and inconveniences. We urge Congress to act before it is too late in order to save our NAS and our economy.

APPENDIX

DOT List on Facilities that Could be Closed in FY 2013

ST

ID

FACILITY NAME/TOWN

1

AL

BFM

Mobile Downtown Airport (Brookley)

2

AL

DHN

Dothan

3

AL

TCL

Tuscaloosa Municipal

4

AR

ASG

Springdale Municipal

5

AR

FSM

Fort Smith

6

AR

FYV

Fayetteville

7

AR

ROG

Rodgers

8

AR

TXK

Texarkana Muni/Webb Fld

9

AZ

GEU

Glendale

10

AZ

GYR

Goodyear

11

AZ

IFP

Laughlin International

12

AZ

RYN

Ryan Field

13

CA

APC

Napa

14

CA

CCR

Concord

15

CA

CMA

Camarillo

16

CA

EMT

El Monte

17

CA

FUL

Fullerton

18

CA

HHR

Hawthorne

19

CA

LVK

Livermore

20

CA

MER

Castle

21

CA

OXR

Oxnard

22

CA

PMD

Palmdale

23

CA

POC

Brackett

24

CA

RAL

Riverside

25

CA

RNM

Ramona

26

CA

SAC

Sacramento Executive

27

CA

SCK

Stockton

28

CA

SDM

San Diego Brown Field

29

CA

SMO

Santa Monica Municipal

30

CA

SNS

Salinas Municipal

31

CA

SQL

San Carlos

32

CA

STS

Santa Rosa

33

CA

VCV

Victorville

34

CA

WHP

Whiteman

35

CA

WJF

William J Fox

36

CO

BJC

Broomfield

37

CO

FTG

Front Range

38

CT

BDR

Bridgeport

39

CT

DXR

Danbury Municipal

40

CT

GON

Groton-New London

41

CT

HFD

Hartford-Brainard

42

CT

HVN

Tweed-New Haven

43

CT

OXC

Waterbury

44

DE

ILG

Greater Wilmington

45

FL

APF

Naples

46

FL

BCT

Boca Raton

47

FL

CRG

Jacksonville/Craig

48

FL

EVB

New Smyrna Beach Municipal

49

FL

FMY

Page Field (Fort Myers)

50

FL

FPR

St Lucie County International (Fort Pierce)

51

FL

HWO

Hollywood/North Perry

52

FL

ISM

Kissimmee Municipal

53

FL

LAL

Lakeland Municipal

54

FL

LEE

Leesburg

55

FL

OCF

Ocala International

56

FL

OMN

Ormand Beach Municipal

57

FL

OPF

Opa Locka

58

FL

ORL

Orlando Executive

59

FL

PGD

Punta Gorda

60

FL

SGJ

St. Augustine

61

FL

SPG

Albert Whitted

62

FL

SUA

Stuart/Witham

63

FL

TIX

Titusville/Cocoa

64

FL

VQQ

Cecil Field

65

GA

ABY

Sw Georgia/Albany-Dougherty

66

GA

AHN

Athens Municipal

67

GA

CSG

Columbus

68

GA

FTY

Fulton County

69

GA

LZU

Gwinnett County

70

GA

MCN

Macon

71

GA

RYY

McCollum

72

HI

JRF

Kalaeloa (John Rogers Field)

73

IA

ALO

Waterloo

74

IA

DBQ

Dubuque

75

IA

SUX

Sioux City

76

ID

IDA

Idaho Falls

77

ID

LWS

Lewiston-Nez Perce County

78

ID

PIH

Pocatello Municipal

79

ID

SUN

Friedman Memorial / Hailey

80

ID

TWF

Twin Falls

81

IL

ALN

St Louis Regional

82

IL

ARR

Aurora

83

IL

BMI

Bloomington/Normal

84

IL

DEC

Decatur

85

IL

DPA

DuPage

86

IL

MDH

So. Illinois/Carbondale

87

IL

MWA

Williamson County

88

IL

SPI

Springfield

89

IL

UGN

Waukegan Regional

90

IN

BAK

Columbus Municipal

91

IN

BMG

Monroe County/Bloomington

92

IN

GYY

Gary Regional

93

IN

LAF

West Lafayette

94

IN

MIE

Muncie/Delaware County

95

KS

FOE

Forbes Field

96

KS

GCK

Garden City Regional

97

KS

HUT

Hutchinson Municipal

98

KS

IXD

New Century

99

KS

MHK

Manhattan  Regional

100

KS

OJC

Johnson County Executive

101

KS

TOP

Philip Billard Municipal

102

KY

LOU

Louisville Bowman

103

KY

OWB

Owensboro/Daviess County

104

KY

PAH

Barkley Regional

105

LA

CWF

Chenault

106

LA

DTN

Shreveport-Dt

107

LA

LCH

Lake Charles

108

LA

MLU

Monroe

109

LA

NEW

Lakefront

110

MA

BAF

Barnes Municipal

111

MA

BVY

Beverly

112

MA

EWB

New Bedford

113

MA

LWM

Lawrence

114

MA

ORH

Worcester

115

MA

OWD

Norwood

116

MD

ESN

Easton/Newnam Field

117

MD

FDK

Frederick Municipal

118

MD

HGR

Washington Co. Reg'l/Hagerstn

119

MD

MTN

Martin State

120

MD

SBY

Salisbury-Wicomico County

121

MI

ARB

Ann Arbor

122

MI

BTL

Battle Creek

123

MI

DET

Coleman A. Young Municipal (Detroit)

124

MI

JXN

Jackson

125

MI

MKG

Muskegon Cnty

126

MI

SAW

Sawyer Gwinn

127

MN

ANE

Anoka

128

MN

FCM

Flying Cloud

129

MN

MIC

Crystal (Minneapolis)

130

MN

STC

St.Cloud Regional

131

MO

BBG

Branson

132

MO

COU

Columbia

133

MO

JEF

Jefferson City Memorial

134

MO

JLN

Joplin Regional

135

MO

STJ

Rosecrans Mem'l/St. Joseph

136

MS

GLH

Greenville Municipal

137

MS

GTR

Golden Triangle Regional

138

MS

HAS

Stennis International

139

MS

HKS

Hawkins Field

140

MS

MEI

Meridian / Key Field

141

MS

OLV

Olive Branch

142

MS

TUP

Tupelo Regional

143

MT

GPI

Glacier Park International

144

MT

HLN

Helena

145

NC

EWN

Coastal Carolina Regional

146

NC

HKY

Hickory

147

NC

INT

Smith Reynolds (Winston Salem)

148

NC

ISO

Kinston

149

NC

JQF

Concord

150

NE

GRI

Central Nebraska/Grd Island

151

NH

ASH

Boire Field/Nashua

152

NJ

CDW

Caldwell

153

NJ

TTN

Trenton

154

NM

AEG

Double Eagle II

155

NM

HOB

Lea County/Hobbs

156

NM

ROW

Roswell

157

NM

SAF

Santa Fe County Municipal

158

NM

ZAB

Albuquerque

159

NY

BGM

Binghamton TRACON

160

NY

FOK

Francis S. Gabreski

161

NY

IAG

Niagara Falls

162

NY

ITH

Tompkins County

163

NY

POU

Dutchess

164

NY

RME

Griffiss AFB

165

OH

CGF

Cuyahoga County

166

OH

MFD

Mansfield

167

OH

OSU

Ohio State University

168

OH

TZR

Columbus  (Bolton Field)

169

OH

YNG

Youngstown Warren Regional

170

OK

ADM

Ardmore Municipal

171

OK

LAW

Lawton Municipal

172

OK

OUN

Univ Of Oklahoma/Westheimer

173

OK

PWA

Wiley Post

174

OK

SWO

Stillwater

175

OK

WDG

Enid Woodring Municipal

176

OR

LMT

Klamath Falls

177

OR

OTH

Southwest Oregon Regional

178

OR

PDT

Pendleton Municipal

179

OR

SLE

McNary Field (Salem)

180

OR

TTD

Troutdale

181

PA

CXY

Capitol City

182

PA

IPT

Williamsport/Lycoming Co.

183

PA

LBE

Arnold Palmer Regional (Latrobe)

184

PA

LNS

Lancaster

185

PA

PNE

Northeast Philadelphia

186

PA

RDG

Reading

187

SC

CRE

Grand Strand/Myrtle Beach

188

SC

FLO

Florence

189

SC

GYH

Greenville/Donaldson Center

190

SC

HXD

Hilton Head

191

TN

MKL

McKeller-Sipes

192

TN

MQY

Smyrna

193

TN

NQA

Millington

194

TX

ACT

Waco Regional

195

TX

BAZ

New Braunfels Municipal

196

TX

BPT

Beaumont

197

TX

BRO

Brownsville Intl

198

TX

CLL

Easterwood

199

TX

CNW

TSTC Waco

200

TX

CXO

Lone Star Executive

201

TX

FWS

Fort Worth Spinks

202

TX

GGG

Longview

203

TX

GKY

Arlington Municipal

204

TX

GPM

Grand Prairie

205

TX

GTU

Georgetown Municipal

206

TX

HYI

San Marcos Municipal

207

TX

RBD

Redbird

208

TX

SGR

Sugarland

209

TX

SSF

Stinson Municipal

210

TX

TKI

McKinney/Collin County Regional

211

TX

TYR

Tyler

212

TX

VCT

Victoria Regional

213

UT

OGD

Ogden-Hinckley Municipal

214

UT

PVU

Provo

215

VA

HEF

Manassas

216

VA

LYH

Lynchburg

217

WA

ALW

Walla Walla Regional

218

WA

MWH

Grant County

219

WA

OLM

Olympia

220

WA

PAE

Paine Field

221

WA

RNT

Renton

222

WA

SFF

Felts Field

223

WA

TIW

Tacoma Narrows

224

WA

YKM

Yakima

225

WI

CWA

Central Wisconsin

226

WI

EAU

Chippewa Valley Regional (Eau Claire)

227

WI

ENW

Kenosha Muni

228

WI

JVL

Southern Wisconsin Regional (Janesville)

229

WI

LSE

La Crosse

230

WI

MWC

Lawrence J Timmerman

231

WI

OSH

Wittman Regional

232

WI

UES

Waukesha County

233

WV

CKB

Clarksburg

234

WV

HLG

Wheeling Ohio  County

235

WV

HTS

Tri State Milton J.Ferguson Field (Huntington)

236

WV

LWB

Greenbriar Valley

237

WV

PKB

Parkersburg/ Wood County

238

WY

CYS

Cheyenne

DOT List on Facilities Whose Overnight Shifts Could be Eliminated in FY 2013

ST

ID

FACILITY NAME/TOWN

1

AK

FAI

Fairbanks International

2

AL

BHM

Birmingham International

3

AR

LIT

Little Rock

4

CA

FAT

Fresno

5

CA

E10

High Desert TRACON

6

CA

ONT

Ontario

7

CA

SMF

Sacramento Towers

8

CO

APA

Centennial

9

CO

COS

City of Colorado Springs Municipal

10

FL

DAB

Daytona

11

FL

FXE

Fort Lauderdale Executive

12

FL

JAX

Jacksonville

13

FL

PBI

Palm Beach International

14

FL

P31

Pensacola TRACON

15

ID

BOI

Boise Air Terminal/Gowen Field

16

IL

MDW

Chicago Midway

17

IL

DPA

DuPage

18

IL

PIA

Greater Peoria Regional

19

IN

FWA

Fort Wayne International

20

IN

HUF

Terre Haute

21

IN

HUF

Terre Haute International-Hulman Field

22

IO

DSM

Des Moines Tower

23

KS

ICT

Wichita

24

KY

LEX

Lexington (Blue Grass)

25

LA

SHV

Shreveport Regional

26

ME

BGR

Bangor International

27

MI

LAN

Capital City (Lansing)

28

MI

YIP

Willow Run (Detroit)

29

MN

DLH

Duluth

30

MO

MKC

Kansas City Downtown

31

MO

SGF

Springfield-Branson Regional

32

MT

GTF

Great Falls

33

NC

FAY

Fayetteville

34

NC

FAY

Fayetteville Regional/Grannis Field

35

NC

GSO

Piedmont Triad Internt'l (Greensboro)

36

ND

FAR

Hector International (Fargo)

37

NE

OMA

Omaha

38

NH

MHT

Manchester

39

NJ

ACY

Atlantic City

40

NM

ABQ

Albuquerque

41

NV

RNO

Reno Tahoe International

42

NY

ALB

Albany County

43

NY

BUF

Buffalo

44

NY

ROC

Greater Rochester Internat'l

45

NY

SWF

Stewart

46

NY

SYR

Syracuse Hancock International

47

OH

CAK

Akron Canton Regional

48

OH

CAK

Canton-Akron

49

OH

DAY

Dayton

50

OH

TOL

Toledo

51

OH

TOL

Toledo Express

52

OH

YNG

Youngstown Warren Regional

53

OK

OKC

Oklahoma City Will Rogers

54

OK

TUL

Tulsa International

55

PA

AGC

Allegheny County

56

PA

MDT

Harrisburg International

57

PA

ABE

Lehigh Valley International (Allentown)

58

PA

AVP

Wilkes Barre Scranton International

59

PR

SJU

Luis Munoz Marin Internat'l (San Juan)

60

SC

CHS

Charleston AFB International

61

SC

CAE

Columbia

62

TN

TYS

McGhee Tyson (Knoxville)

63

TN

BNA

Nashville

64

TX

ABI

Abilene Regional

65

TX

AUS

Austin

66

TX

CRP

Corpus Christi International

67

TX

ELP

El Paso

68

TX

FTW

Fort Worth Meacham

69

TX

LBB

Lubbock International

70

VA

ORF

Norfolk

71

VA

RIC

Richmond

72

VA

ROA

Roanoke Regional Woodrum Field

73

WA

BFI

Boeing

74

WA

GEG

Spokane International

75

WI

MKE

General Mitchell Internat'l (Milwaukee)

76

WV

HTS

Tri State Milton J.Ferguson Field (Huntington)

77

WV

CRW

Yeager  (Charleston)

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