CAA - Norway

Visiting address

Sjøgata 45-47

N-8006

BODØ

Postal address

PO Box: 243

BODØ , 8001

Contact

Tel + 47 75 58 50 00

Fax + 47 75 58 50 05

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Association information

Briefly on the Civil Aviation Authority

The Civil Aviation Authority's main task is to contribute to increased safety in all Norwegian civil aviation.

Our office is in Bodø and the Civil Aviation Authority has 190 employees with high competence in all fields of aerospace. We are an independent and independent administrative body responsible for Norwegian Civil Aviation, but are directly subject to and report to the Ministry of Transport and Communications.

The Civil Aviation Authority is responsible for introducing and adapting national and international regulations. In addition, we make regulations for Norwegian aviation. During the years the Civil Aviation Authority has existed, the rules for civil aviation have been from national to increasingly governed by the EU. The fact that Norway and several countries in Europe now follow an EU regulatory framework mean that in many areas we have the same rules throughout Europe.

We supervise the actors in Norwegian aviation to comply with applicable laws, regulations and regulations. To ensure that this happens, we supervise airlines, airline companies, airline schools, aircraft, licensees, airports and landing sites for helicopters.

The Civil Aviation Authority also issues certificates to persons and aviation industries, such as airlines, workshops, pilots and cabin crews.

Together with the Ministry of Transport and Communications, the Civil Aviation Authority participates in international organizations in order to assert Norwegian interests. Two of these organizations are European EASA (European Aviation Safety Agency) and the United Nations Civil Aviation Organization - ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) .

Lars Kobberstad is the director of air traffic.

 

What does the Civil Aviation Authority do?

Access control, business supervision, regulatory development and information activities are the Authority's core tasks. But what does it mean?

The Civil Aviation Authority has the main responsibility for supervision of Norwegian aviation. Supervision shall also be an active driver for safe and social aviation in line with overall objectives for government policy on transport. Here you can read more about our core tasks.

Access
The Civil Aviation Authority carries out various forms of control before a supervisory object is approved and a rights document issued. The most common forms of access control are document inspection, testing and inspections. Access control takes place in relation to organizations, aircraft, material and persons who are either employed or seeking employment in civil aviation. Access control is initiated by applications from aviation actors or requirements for regular renewal of existing rights.

Business Audit
In essence, this planned inspections of different groups constitute supervisory objects. The basis for business oversight is national and international requirements for aviation safety, and on this basis, the Authority has defined a policy for how often inspections are to be carried out for the various groups of supervisory objects.

Regulatory Development
The main part of regulatory developments takes place in international cooperation forums that the Civil Aviation Authority is actively involved in. The regulations determine what requirements must be made to achieve the highest possible level of safety. In Norway, the national regulations are continuously updated as international rules are introduced as Norwegian.

Information
An important part of preventive air safety work is to inform users. Security awareness is being developed continuously and this should be communicated efficiently. Examples of information measures are announcements, accident statistics and events, conferences, press releases and other information material. The web pages are today the most important information channel, but we are continually considering other ways of informing. In addition, we arrange more major conferences, where the Aviation Conference in Bodø today is one of Northern Europe's largest annual aviation events. Employees of the Civil Aviation Authority often participate in other conferences, events and events to inform about our business.

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